Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Benjamin Godard: Intégrale des sonates pour violon et piano (2016) [FLAC 24 bit, 96 kHz]

Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli - Benjamin Godard: Intégrale des sonates pour violon et piano (2016) [FLAC 24 bit, 96 kHz] Download

Artist: Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli
Album: Benjamin Godard: Intégrale des sonates pour violon et piano
Genre: Classical
Release Date: 2016
Audio Format:: FLAC (tracks) 24 bit, 96 kHz
Duration: 01:28:06
Total Tracks: 17
Total Size: 1,55 GB

Tracklist:

1-01. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 3 en Sol Mineur, Op. 9: I. Allegro moderato (08:41)
1-02. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 3 en Sol Mineur, Op. 9: II. Scherzo (non troppo vivace) (03:57)
1-03. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 3 en Sol Mineur, Op. 9: III. Andante (04:49)
1-04. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 3 en Sol Mineur, Op. 9: IV. Intermezzo (un poco moderato) (02:57)
1-05. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 3 en Sol Mineur, Op. 9: V. Allegro (05:26)
1-06. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 1 en Do Mineur, Op. 1: I. Andante (05:32)
1-07. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 1 en Do Mineur, Op. 1: II. Scherzo (02:59)
1-08. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 1 en Do Mineur, Op. 1: III. Andante (04:59)
1-09. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 1 en Do Mineur, Op. 1: IV. Finale (allegro vivace) (05:04)
2-01. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 4 en La Bémol Majeur, Op. 12: I. Vivace ma non troppo (07:52)
2-02. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 4 en La Bémol Majeur, Op. 12: II. Allegro vivace ma non presto (04:09)
2-03. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 4 en La Bémol Majeur, Op. 12: III. Andante (07:02)
2-04. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 4 en La Bémol Majeur, Op. 12: IV. Allegro molto (06:46)
2-05. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 2 en La Mineur, Op. 2: I. Andante-allegro vivace e appassionato (07:15)
2-06. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 2 en La Mineur, Op. 2: II. Intermezzo (vivace) (02:01)
2-07. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 2 en La Mineur, Op. 2: III. Andante quasi adagio (04:15)
2-08. Nicolas Dautricourt, Dana Ciocarli – Sonate pour violon et piano No. 2 en La Mineur, Op. 2: IV. Finale (allegro) (04:15)

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In 1863 Martine de Béhague’s grandmother bought the site where the Romanian Embassy now stands. She commissioned Gabriel Hippolyte Alexandre Destailleur (1822-1893), the architect who restored the châteaux of Courances and Vaux-le-Vicomte, to build a Louis XV-style town house that would be an appropriate setting for her collection of 18th-century artefacts she planned to house there. The architect was internationally renowned, had connections with the Imperial family and had worked for the Rothschilds in Vienna among others. Destailleur owned an impressive collection of architectural plans and fittings. His profound understanding of period décor made him superbly quali ed. He also had access to period panelling and decorative embellishments that had come onto the market as a result of Haussmann’s innovations. The writer Henri de Régnier singled out the building as “one of the most beautiful houses in our city.” On March 27, 1939, the building was sold to the Romanian State and used to house its embassy.

In 1897/98, Gustave-Adolphe Gerhardt (1843-1921), a winner of the Prix de Rome for Architecture, architect of a number of notable residences and responsible for the restoration of the Collège de France, designed and completed a full-scale concert hall and private theatre, later named La Salle Byzantine, that drew on ancient basilical plans and con gurations of Byzantine churches. The theatre also served as a museum. Various sources suggest musical instruments and pain- tings were displayed there. In 1900, Le Monde Musical wrote that the hall could accommodate 600 people and that a large organ was installed there. The organ still stands in part and is one of the rare examples of an extant non-religious organ from the beginning of the 20th-century still in existence. …

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