Bob Marley – Exodus (Deluxe Edition) (1977/2022) [FLAC 24bit, 96 kHz]

Bob Marley - Exodus (Deluxe Edition) (1977/2022) [FLAC 24bit, 96 kHz] Download

Artist: Bob Marley
Album: Exodus (Deluxe Edition)
Genre: Reggae
Release Date: 1977/2022
Audio Format:: FLAC (tracks) 24bit, 96 kHz
Duration: 02:19:18
Total Tracks: 30
Total Size: 2,98 GB

Tracklist:

1. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Natural Mystic (03:27)
2. Bob Marley & The Wailers – So Much Things To Say (03:07)
3. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Guiltiness (03:19)
4. Bob Marley & The Wailers – The Heathen (02:31)
5. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Exodus (07:39)
6. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Jamming (03:30)
7. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Waiting In Vain (04:15)
8. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Turn Your Lights Down Low (03:38)
9. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Three Little Birds (02:59)
10. Bob Marley & The Wailers – One Love / People Get Ready (Medley) (02:54)
11. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Natural Mystic (Alternate Version) (03:29)
12. Bob Marley & The Wailers – The Heathen (Alternate Version) (02:24)
13. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Exodus (7″ Version) (04:18)
14. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Exodus (B-Side / Single Version) (03:10)
15. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Jamming (7″ Version) (03:20)
16. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Jamming (12″ Version) (05:54)
17. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Jamming (Dub) (03:07)
18. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Punky Reggae Party (7″ Version / Original Mix) (04:28)
19. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Punky Reggae Party (12″ Version) (06:55)
20. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Punky Reggae Party (Jamaican 12″ Version) (09:22)
21. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Punky Reggae Party (Dub / Jamaican 12″ Version) (08:49)
22. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Waiting In Vain (Advert Mix) (04:01)
23. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Waiting In Vain (Alternate Version) (04:43)
24. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Roots (03:45)
25. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Three Little Birds (Alternate Mix) (03:06)
26. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Keep On Moving (06:25)
27. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Keep On Moving (Dub) (07:12)
28. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Exodus (Radio Advertisement) (01:08)
29. Bob Marley & The Wailers – So Much Things To Say (Live At The Rainbow Theatre, London / June 1, 1977 / Edit) (04:25)
30. Bob Marley & The Wailers – Exodus (Live At The Rainbow Theatre, London / June 2, 1977 / Edit) (11:45)

Download:

Three Highly Lauded and Previously Unreleased Bob Marley & The Wailers Concerts From London’s Rainbow Theatre To Be Released On June 3, 10, And 17. Revised Exodus: Deluxe Edition Releasing June 24.

[LOS ANGELES, CA – JUNE 3, 2022] Beginning today and throughout June, The Marley Family, Island Records, and UMe mark the 45th anniversary of Exodus – named the “Best Album of the 20th Century” by Time magazine in 1999 – with the digital premiere of three of the four nights from Bob Marley & the Wailers’ historic run at London’s Rainbow Theatre and a consolidated, revised digital Exodus:Deluxe Edition.

Following an assassination attempt in Kingston, Jamaica, in December 1976, Bob Marley and his band moved to London – in “exodus” from their home country – and recorded tracks for what became both the Exodus and Kaya albums. Marley’s Exodus, featuring the timeless tracks Jamming, Three Little Birds, One Love/People Get Ready, and the epic title song, came first, which led to early positive reviews, ten early dates around Western Europe and shows at the Rainbow Theatre in London’s Finsbury Park during release week. But an injury to Bob led to the abrupt cancellation of the rest of the Exodus tour, including expected U.S. breakthrough shows scheduled for late summer, leaving June 1-2-3-4 the final performances by the Wailers that year.Every musician has their standout record, but Exodus is so much more than that for Bob Marley. Not only did this album propel the singer to whole new heights, but it also tells the story of an artist turned statesman.

It’s 1976: Bob Marley thinks he’s reached the pinnacle of his career after Eric Clapton reveals his name to the world after covering his song I Shot the Sheriff. After the departure of Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer two years earlier, Bob Marley is the sole captain of his ship and has become a star in Jamaica, where a tumultuous election is brewing. Michael Manley, the Prime Minister, is up against Edward Seaga, a man who has the support of people living in the Tivoli Gardens district in Kingston. Seaga sent gangs to terrorise other areas of the city that didn’t favour him, and on the 3rd of December 1976, gunmen visited Bob Marley’s house. It was suspected that his political stance was leaning towards Manley, and the singer, his wife Rita and his manager Don Taylor were all shot at. Miraculously, no one died. Injured but still alive, Bob Marley took to the stage two days later at the Smile Jamaica Concert, revealing the wounds beneath his shirt and gaining popularity in the process. Despite this act of bravery, it would be his last show in Jamaica before his self-imposed exile to England.

Once across the Atlantic, Bob Marley stepped into Island Studios in January 1977, as if he felt there was some kind of urgency to record his music. The album’s title, Exodus, obviously refers to his own exile, but it’s also a nod to the Rasta concept of repatriation, which advocates for a return to Africa. Feeling ultra-productive, Bob and his musicians recorded about twenty tracks, half of which were used for the following album, Kaya. Whilst the first half of the record is brimming with politically charged lyrics (Natural Mystic, Heathen and Exodus, as well as So Much Things to Say and Guiltiness), the rest is a lot more easy-going, including songs such as Waiting in Vain, Jamming and Three Little Birds. It’s clear Bob wanted to keep things as light-hearted as possible. The album concludes with the legendary Punky Reggae Party, a tribute to the reggae-infused English punk musicians. The track, with its frantic rhythm that’s worlds away from the Wailers typical sound, is a monumental moment, bringing together Lee Perry (who co-wrote the lyrics), Sly Dunbar (drums), and the members of the bands Aswad and Third World, who were also signed to Island.

Upon its release, the record was an instant hit. Each single only propelled Bob Marley further into superstardom. When he finally returned to Jamaica on the 22nd of April 1978 for the One Love Peace Concert, he miraculously managed to bring enemies Michael Manley and Edward Seaga together on stage. He forced them to shake hands whilst the Wailers played the hit Jamming… a truly historical moment. – Smaël Bouaici

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