Flute Ensemble LYNX – Flute (2007) {SACD ISO + FLAC 24/88,2}

LYNX – Flute (2007) [2.0 & 5.1]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DST64 2.0 & 5.1 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 68:29 minutes | Covers included | 3,44 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Covers included | 1,17 GB
Genre: Classical

Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music born of four women flute ensemble by, LYNX album. Ono or restricted in charge of producing and recording. Smetana “Moldau symphonic poem from” My Fatherland “,” Dvorak “Largo Symphony No. 9” From the New World “,” Ravel “Bolero”, Beethoven “Symphony No. 5” destiny “” and others, recorded a total of nine songs. – from amazon

Read More

The Doobie Brothers – The Captain And Me (1973) [Japanese SACD 2011] {SACD ISO + FLAC 24/88,2}

The Doobie Brothers – The Captain And Me (1973) [Japanese SACD 2011]
PS3 Rip | ISO | DST 64 2.0 & 5.1 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 42:05 mins | Scans included | 2,79 GB
or FLAC 2.0 (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 900 MB
Genre: Rock | SACD Hybrid reissue release from The Doobie Brothers. Features 2.0 Stereo and 5.1 multichannel surround.

The Doobie Brothers’ third long-player was the charm, their most substantial and consistent album to date, and one that rode the charts for a year. It was also a study in contrasts, Tom Johnston’s harder-edged, bolder rocking numbers balanced by Patrick Simmons’ more laid-back country-rock ballad style. The leadoff track, Johnston’s “Natural Thing,” melded the two, opening with interlocking guitars and showcasing the band’s exquisite soaring harmonies around a beautiful melody, all wrapped up in a midtempo beat — the result was somewhere midway between Allman Brothers-style virtuosity and Eagles/Crosby & Nash-type lyricism, which defined this period in the Doobies’ history and gave them a well-deserved lock on the top of the charts. Next up was the punchy, catchy “Long Train Runnin’,” a piece they’d been playing for years as an instrumental — a reluctant Johnston was persuaded by producer Ted Templeman to write lyrics to it and record the song, and the resulting track became the group’s next hit. The slashing, fast-tempo “China Grove” and “Without You” represented the harder side of the Doobies’ sound, and were juxtaposed with Simmons’ romantic country-rock ballads “Clear as the Driven Snow,” and “South City Midnight Lady.” Simmons also showed off his louder side with “Evil Woman,” while Johnston showed his more reflective side with “Dark Eyed Cajun Woman,” “Ukiah” and “The Captain and Me” — the latter, a soaring rocker clocking in at nearly five minutes, features radiant guitars and harmonies, soaring ever higher and faster to a triumphant finish.

Read More

Mostly Autumn – Passengers (2003) {SACD ISO + FLAC 24/88,2}

Mostly Autumn – Passengers (2003) [2.0 & 5.1]
PS3 Rip | ISO | DST 64 2.0 & 5.1 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 60:47 minutes | Scans included | 3,6 GB
or FLAC 2.0 (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 1,16 GB
The blend Progressive & Atmospheric Rock with Celtic sounds | Classic Rock Productions’ SACD Reissue 2004

Mostly Autumn is a British band, producing music heavily influenced by classic 1970s rock. The group formed in 1996, and have built their reputation through constant touring, never signing to a major label. The group’s early influences were Genesis, Renaissance and Pink Floyd, and folk music. This is their eagerly anticipated fifth studio album.

Read More

Weather Report – Mysterious Traveller (1974/2002) {SACD ISO + FLAC 24/88,2}

Weather Report – Mysterious Traveller (1974) [Reissue 2002] {2.0 & 5.1}
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DST64 2.0 & 5.1 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 47:55 minutes | Scans included | 2,97 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | 48:05 mins | Scans included | 974 MB
Genre: Jazz

Weather Report started out as a jazz equivalent of what the rock world in 1970 was calling a “supergroup.” But unlike most of the rock supergroups, this one not only kept going for a good 15 years, it more than lived up to its billing, practically defining the state of the jazz-rock art throughout almost all of its run.

Read More

Ray Charles – Genius Loves Company (2004) {SACD ISO + FLAC 24/88,2}

Ray Charles – Genius Loves Company (2004) [2.0 & 5.1]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DST64 2.0 & 5.1 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 51:34 minutess | Scans included | 3,38 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 1,03 GB
Genre: Jazz, Blues

Genius Loves Company is the last studio album Ray Charles completed before his death in June 2004. Prior to this, the last studio album he released was Strong Love Affair in 1996, which was a stab at modern pop, filled with new songs and given an adult contemporary sheen. It was not one of his most distinctive efforts, even when judged against his latter-day albums, and it disappeared not long after its release. Charles left Warner and, years later, signed with Concord, who released Genius Loves Company, which had a decidedly different approach than the all-modern Strong Love Affair. As the title acknowledges with a wink, this is a duets album, which may be a little commonplace as far as latter-day superstar albums go but is still a step up from his previous studio album since it puts Ray Charles in a comfortable, relaxed situation that plays to his strengths. Instead of trying to put Charles in a modern setting, producers John Burk and Phil Ramone (Burk helmed seven of the album’s tracks, Ramone is responsible for the other five, and their work fits together seamlessly) go for a clean retro setting with a few guitars, synths, and a rhythm section, occasionally dressing it with an orchestra or some strings. In other words, apart from the glistening production, it’s not far removed from any of Charles’ crossover records from the ’60s, and he’s also given a strong set of songs, largely familiar pop classics, from “Fever” and “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” to “Sorry Seems to Be the Hardest Word” and “Crazy Love.” His duet partners are fairly predictable — classy newcomers like Norah Jones and Diana Krall, but also old stalwarts like Elton John, B.B. King, Johnny Mathis, James Taylor, Bonnie Raitt, and the ubiquitous Willie Nelson (who has never sounded older than he does here on “It Was a Very Good Year”) — but they’re also reliable, never overshadowing Ray yet never shrinking in his shadow either; in short, it sounds more like a real duets album than most superstar duet records. The end result is modest, friendly, laid-back, and pleasing, one that remains faithful to Charles’ music while sounding relatively fresh. It may not be weighty enough to be a career-capping masterpiece, but it’s sweet enough to be an appropriate final album — which is far more than can be said of Strong Love Affair, or any of the other albums he cut in the ’80s or ’90s for that matter.

Read More

Ray Charles and Count Basie Orchestra – Ray Sings Basie Swings (2006/2007) {SACD ISO + FLAC 24/88,2}

Ray Charles and Count Basie Orchestra – Ray Sings Basie Swings (2006) [Reissue 2007]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DST64 2.0 & 5.1 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 48:25 minutes | Scans included | 2,95 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 979 MB
Features 2.0 Stereo and 5.1 multichannel surround sound | Telarc # SACD-63679 | Genre: Jazz

Ray Sings, Basie Swings, huh? Hmm, well, yes and no. You see, the story goes something like this. In 2005, Concord Records exec John Burk, who produced Ray Charles’ superb late-career, Grammy-winning Genius Loves Company, found a reel of tape simply labeled “Ray/Basie.” Upon further analysis, it was determined that the 1973 recording featured Ray Charles backed by his own band — Count Basie and his band had actually recorded earlier that day. Charles’ vocal was exceptionally prominent in the mix and at first it was thought that this potentially momentous discovery would prove unable to bear fruit. But then Burk brainstormed and decided to bring the current Count Basie Orchestra — whose leader died in 1984 — into the studio to lay tracks behind Charles’ vocals. So there’s no Basie on Ray Sings, Basie Swings, but that’s merely a technicality, because there is some great music. Charles was in fine form vocally on this mix of remakes of his early ABC-Paramount-era hits and then-recent material. The consecutive reworkings of “Busted,” “Cryin’ Time,” and “I Can’t Stop Loving You,” three of his defining Top Ten hits of the early ’60s, are given brassy, bluesy treatments here, and standards ranging from Oscar Hammerstein II’s “Oh, What a Beautiful Morning” to the Beatles’ “The Long and Winding Road” are transformed in Charles’ hands. The set-closing “Georgia on My Mind,” as close to a signature song as Charles had, is given a tender, minimalist reading, but the track preceding it, “Look What They’ve Done to My Song, Ma,” picked up from the folk-pop singer Melanie, is quite possibly the album’s highlight. It’s appeared on other Ray Charles compilations before, but the gospelized, testifyin’ version featured here has got to be the liveliest take on that song anyone’s ever devised. So, yeah, there’s no Count Basie to be found here, but his namesake orchestra does him proud. For one of those postmortem studio patch jobs that owes as much to technology as talent, it’s a fine addition to the Ray Charles oeuvre, as long as one can get past the semi-false advertising of its title.

Read More

Ray Charles – Genius + Soul = Jazz (1961) [Analogue Productions Remaster 2012] {SACD ISO + FLAC 24/88,2}

Ray Charles – Genius+Soul=Jazz (1961) [Analogue Productions Remaster 2012]
PS3 Rip | ISO | SACD DSD64 Stereo > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 36:50 minutes | Scans included | 1,49 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 772 MB
Genre: Soul, Jazz

One of the best early-’60s examples of soul/jazz crossover, this record, like several of his dates from the period, featured big-band arrangements (played by the Count Basie band). This fared better than some of Charles’ similar outings, however, if only because it muted some of his straight pop aspirations in favor of some pretty mean and lean, cut-to-the-heart-of-the-matter B-3 Hammond organ licks. Most of the album is instrumental and swings pretty vivaciously, although Charles does take a couple of vocals with “I’m Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town” and “I’ve Got News for You.” Yet one of those instrumentals, a cover of the Clovers’ “One Mint Julep,” would give Charles one of his most unpredictable (and best) early-’60s hits.

Read More

Ray Charles & Betty Carter – Ray Charles And Betty Carter (1961) [Analogue Productions Remaster 2012] {SACD ISO + FLAC 24/88,2}

Ray Charles & Betty Carter – Ray Charles And Betty Carter (1961)
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DSD64 Stereo & DST64 3.0 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 42:34 minutes | Scans included | 2,72 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | Scans included | 854 MB
Genre: Soul, R&B

This pairing of two totally idiosyncratic vocalists acquired legendary status over the decades in which it had been out of print. But the proof is in the listening, and frankly it doesn’t represent either artist’s best work. There is certainly a powerful, often sexy rapport between the two — Charles in his sweet balladeering mode, Carter with her uniquely keening, drifting high register — and they definitely create sparks in the justly famous rendition of “Baby, It’s Cold Outside.” The main problem is in Marty Paich’s string/choir arrangements, which too often cross the line into treacle, whereas his charts for big band are far more listenable. Moreover, Charles’ sweetness can get a bit cloying, too, although some of the old grit emerges on “Takes Two to Tango”.

Read More

Train – My Private Nation (2003) {SACD ISO + FLAC 24/88,2}

Train – My Private Nation (2003)
PS3 Rip | ISO | DSD64/DST64 2.0 & 5.1 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 42:36 minutes | Scans included | 3,79 GB
or FLAC 2.0 (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | 43:10 mins | Scans included | 1,1 GB
Genre: Rock

Train is building a reputation as one of rock’s tightest outfits one single at a time. The clever and sweet “Meet Virginia” was eclipsed by the gorgeous “Drops of Jupiter.” My Private Nation may well prove these guys can squeeze more than one hit out of the album–although none are as enchanting as their breakthrough single. They continue to gravitate toward Elton John-inspired keys-and-guitar arrangements that are marked by studied rhythms and stellar production. While there’s inventiveness to be found in these songs, there’s a sameness to the tracks that makes the album as a whole fall a little flat. While attempting to recapture the grandeur of “Drops of Jupiter” on the opening song, “Calling All Angels,” they overreach, and the pop-culture references scattered throughout date almost instantly. My Private Nation is a clean, intelligent disc, but it’s also safe and middle of the road. Train’s fans would be richly rewarded if the band took a few more risks.

Read More

Phil Lesh and Friends – There And Back Again (2002) {SACD ISO + FLAC 24/88,2}

 

Phil Lesh & Friends – There And Back Again (2002) [2.0 & 5.1]
PS3 Rip | SACD ISO | DST64 2.0 & 5.1 > 1-bit/2.8224 MHz | 62:53 minutes | Scans included | 3,97 GB
or FLAC 2.0 Stereo (converted with foobar2000 to tracks) 24bit/88,2 kHz | 62:57 mins | Scans | 1,25 GB
Genre: Rock

After releasing Love Will See You Through, a live album featuring onetime guests like Jorma Kaukonen, Phil Lesh organized a permanent touring and recording band under the moniker Phil Lesh & Friends. This quintet, with an instrumentation that replicated the Grateful Dead’s except for the inclusion of only one drummer, featured former Allman Brothers Band guitarists Warren Haynes and Jimmy Herring, former Zen Tricksters keyboardist Rob Barraco, and former Bruce Hornsby & the Range drummer John Molo. There and Back Again is this unit’s first studio album and, not surprisingly, it sounds like a cross between the Grateful Dead and the Allman Brothers Band. Lesh has made one other crucial connection, bringing in Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter to write the words for six of the 11 songs. (One of them is “Liberty,” a Jerry Garcia co-composition the Grateful Dead performed toward the end.) Hunter has a distinctive, wordy writing style, full of allusions, aphorisms, and wordplay that will be familiar to any Deadhead. The leadoff track, “Celebration,” with music by Lesh, is very much the product of the team who wrote the Grateful Dead’s “Box of Rain”; it is a statement of purpose, proclaiming a recommitment to a positive viewpoint despite “stolen elections, corruption, and hate.” Haynes, who does most of the singing (though Lesh and Barraco get leads, too), was a careful student of Gregg Allman’s throaty style, and his stinging slide guitar work recalls Duane Allman. For the most part, the bandmembers keep their natural tendency to jam in check, placing emphasis on the well-written songs. The tracks run four to six minutes each and usually fade out with the band still playing, so this material no doubt stretches out in concert. The result is a surprisingly well-organized and accessible collection that is the best album yet made by a Grateful Dead spinoff band.

Read More